A paper entitled ‘Carrickmines Castle – a modern perspective on medieval fortifications’ is to be published in August by Transport Infrastructure Ireland in  ‘Above & below: the archaeology of roads and light rail‘ under the editorship of Michael Stanley. Carrickmines was first settled in the wake of the arrival of the Anglo-Normans in 1169-70, and was held by a number of different families until the siege of Carrickmines in 1642 during the Irish Confederate Wars 1641-53. Today, the site lies at Junction 15 of the M50 motorway, where archaeological investigations explored the three conjoined enclosures during one of the largest excavations of a medieval site in Ireland.Carrickmines gatehouse

One of the key challenges in understanding Carrickmines is the difficulty in reconstructing how a castle at the site may have looked in the past. Carrickmines formed part of the Dublin Pale from the 15th century, and had previously been part of a system of defensive wards (along with Bray, Dundrum, Tallaght and other places) in the 14th century. This paper discusses the medieval fortifications, and in the absence of a tall stone tower, considered how we envisage Carrickmines castle may have looked in the past.

Carrickmines Castle

Ref: Bolton, J. (2016)”Carrickmines Castle: a modern perspective on medieval fortifications”, in Stanley, M. (ed) Above and below: the archaeology of roads and light rail. Dublin. TII Heritage 3. Transport Infrastructure Ireland,

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